Snap, Sizzle & Cook

Sharing my love of food

Archive for the tag “Beef”

Bacon Beef Rolls & Tangy Red Cabbage Slaw – Daily Dish Recipe #3

Once again a selection of fresh wholesome ingredients from Daily Dish for this, I recon, my favourite dish so far. Not only am I a huge fan of bacon, but I also love a fresh, crunchy cabbage salad, which I’ve made before HERE.
Ingredients needed for this recipe
For this recipe, you will need:
500g steak mince
250g homestyle bacon
100g mature cheddar – finely grated
1 egg – beat gently with a fork
2 tsp chilli powder
2 cloves of garlic – crush, peel & chop finely
1/2 red cabbage – slice finely
2 carrots – grated
20g chopped coriander
4 spring onions – slice finely
60ml apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp. fresh ginger – grated
4 tsp Dijon mustard
30ml mayonnaise
Plated Bacon Beef Rolls and Tangy Red cabbage slaw
Instructions:
Preheat oven to 190 degrees Celsius.
Mix the following ingredients in a bowl – steak mince, grated cheddar, beaten egg, chilli powder, chopped garlic, salt and pepper. Divide the mixture into portions – so you have about 2-3 rolls per person. Roll each portion into a ball. Wrap a slice of bacon around each one. Line a baking sheet with tin foil and place the bacon beef rolls on a baking sheet. Then pop into the pre-heated oven and cook for 35 minutes.
For the red cabbage slaw, combine cabbage, carrots and spring onions and mix.
For the tangy dressing, combine apple cider vinegar, grated fresh ginger, Dijon mustard, mayonnaise and season with freshly ground salt and pepper. Mix well and pour over red cabbage slaw.

Fresh tangy red cabbage slaw

Advertisements

Beverly Hills “then and now” experience

What better way to spend a Thursday afternoon than at the beautiful, tranquil setting of the Beverly Hills.  This landmark Hotel in Umhlanga, KZN is known for her gracious hospitality, beauty and exceptional service from friendly, forthcoming staff.

Breathtaking view from the balcony

Breathtaking view from the balcony

This year, 2014, marks the hotels 50th birthday and for reasons unknown, I was one of the “chosen ones” invited to enjoy a taster lunch at the Beverly Hills eminent restaurant, The Sugar Club.
The Beverly Hills
The concept behind the lunch which was named “Then and Now” for nostalgic reasons was to taste familiar, memorable dishes from the 70’s and compare how they are prepared today in 2014. Being a reminiscent and nostalgic kind of person, my favourite dishes were from the “then” side of the plate with the exception of the Crayfish Thermidore only because I’m a bacon freak.
The food was deliciously and lovingly prepared by Head Chef, Tony Kocke who explained each dish to us as it arrived at the table.

Our "then and now" menu for the afternoon

Our “then and now” menu for the afternoon

Below are pics of the dishes we ate which I’ve captioned directly from the menu. The left hand side of the plate with the exception of the dessert dishes is the “then” and the right hand side, which is quite obvious because of the plating techniques is the “now”

The "then" on the left is sliced ripe avocado served with a tiger prawn tail topped with Marie Rose sauce and garnished with a lemon wedge.  The "now" on the right is avocado ice cream surrounded by poached Atlantic prawns served with tears of aioli sauce and pearls of tomato and spicy cognac sauce garnished with micro herbs

The “then” on the left is sliced ripe avocado served with a tiger prawn tail topped with Marie Rose sauce and garnished with a lemon wedge. The “now” on the right is avocado ice cream surrounded by poached Atlantic prawns served with tears of aioli sauce and pearls of tomato and spicy cognac sauce garnished with micro herbs

The classic "then" crayfish is served in a mustard mushroom sauce topped with parmesan cheese and sprinkled with paprika powder.  The "now" which was my favourite because of the bacon is slightly grilled scallops of crayfish tail topped with brandy flambéed exotic mushroom, mustard beurre blanc and flame parmesan foam

The classic “then” crayfish is served in a mustard mushroom sauce topped with parmesan cheese and sprinkled with paprika powder. The “now” which was my favourite because of the bacon is slightly grilled scallops of crayfish tail topped with brandy flambéed exotic mushroom, mustard beurre blanc and flame parmesan foam

On the left is the "then" Beef fillet surrounded with mushroom mousse baked in golden puff pastry served with béarnaise sauce and on the right of the dish is the "now" Fillet of Midland Beef presented with puff pastry coins filled with mushroom mousse served with tarragon infused egg jelly

On the left is the “then” Beef fillet surrounded with mushroom mousse baked in golden puff pastry served with béarnaise sauce and on the right of the dish is the “now” Fillet of Midland Beef presented with puff pastry coins filled with mushroom mousse served with tarragon infused egg jelly

Table side prep of the "then" Crepes Suzette

Table side prep of the “then” Crepes Suzette

"Now" is a Suzette mousse in pancake cone with orange liquid jelly and vanilla pod ice cream drops

“Now” is a Suzette mousse in pancake cone with orange liquid jelly and vanilla pod ice cream drops

Meatballs with Napolitana Sauce

I consider myself to be a relatively organised person.  I like to plan and prepare ahead of time so that I’m not left to rush at the last minute.   I plan my meals in such a way that by the time I wake up in the morning I know what I’m cooking for dinner.  Sometimes I’ll have my dinner ideas drawn up for a few nights depending on my work load and how my week ahead looks.

This recipe however is slightly different.  It was a Thursday afternoon last minute decision.  I decided to make meatballs in tribute to Sanet of Masterchef Season 2 who was eliminated because of her choice of dish, which was meatballs or in her case one giant big meatball. The challenged was to use any cut of beef as a main ingredient and be as creative as possible in producing any dish of your choice.  Sanet’s dish was unfortunately not adequate based on the task and requirements set forth by the judges.  I really liked Sanet (tears and all) and was really sad to see her go.

These meatballs (in my view) are rather creative as they are versatile in every way.  They can transform into a burger patty or meatloaf using all the same ingredients.  I served my meatballs with home-made tomato based sauce (Napolitana Sauce) which I served on a bed of creamy, buttery mash.

For the meatballs you will need:
500g beef mince
1 onion (finely chopped)
Splash of olive oil
Cumin and Coriander (5ml each)
Half a bunch of fresh coriander finely chopped
2 slices of crustless white bread soaked in milk
1 egg plus 1 egg yolk
Seasoning

Fry the onion in the olive oil till translucent, remove from stove and allow to cool.  In a bowl combine all other ingredients and make sure to squeeze as much milk from the bread as possible before adding to the mince.  Add onions, combine well and place in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.
While the mince is resting in the fridge, start preparing the Napolitano Sauce.

You will need:
60g salted butter
1 Onion (finely chopped)
2 Leeks (sliced)
2 Carrots (diced)
2 Tbsp crushed garlic
1 Tsp crushed chilli
50ml tomato paste
1 cup white wine
2 tins of chopped tomato
2 Tbsp sugar
2 Tbsp chopped parsley
Seasoning

Method:
Fry onion, leeks and carrots in the salted butter till the onions are translucent.  Reduce heat and add garlic and chilli.  Add tomato paste stirring continuously and ensuring paste does not burn.  Remove pot from heat if necessary.  Add in cup of white wine and allow flavours to mingle for about 5 minutes.  Return pot to stove and add the remaining ingredients.  Simmer for about 20 minutes.  Taste as you go along and adjust to suite your own tastebuds – nothing wrong with that!

Remove meatballs from the fridge.  Roll into balls and lay out on a baking tray.  You should get about 20 small meatballs from the batch.  Bake for 20 minutes at 180 degrees Celsius.  Add meatballs to the Napolitano sauce and allow to simmer for a further 10 minutes.  Serve on a bed of mash potatoes or rice.

South African Goulash with dumplings

My inspiration for this dish comes from the label on the packet of beef that I picked up at the supermarket.  It was simply categorized as Beef Goulash.  I decided to purchase it and make my own Goulash.
This dish originates from Hungary and is a soup or stew made from beef, noodles and vegetables.  Click here for the source of information. You’ll notice from this article that I used the paprika they mentioned.  I decided to treat this recipe as I do my chicken dishes which without marinating for a couple of hours can be quite tough.  I similarly used ingredients that I would naturally use in an ordinary stew.  The outcome was absolutely delicious. 
Goulash and dumplings 001 (476x317) copy
500 – 700g Beef cubes
2 Tbsp Cornflour
250ml buttermilk
7.5ml paprika
Seasoning
Place beef cubes in a bowl and coat well with cornflour, paprika and seasoning.  Pour the buttermilk over the meat, cover and allow to marinate in the fridge overnight.

1 Red Onion (diced)
1 Tbsp Olive Oil
1 Ltr Water
100ml Concentrated Liquid Beef Stock
1.5 cups of fresh top & tailed green beans (quartered)
1.5 cups carrots, diced
15ml Paprika
2.5ml White Pepper
Salt
In a large pot, fry the onions and paprika in the olive oil. Transfer onions into a separate bowl when soft and transparent. In the same pot used for the onions, fry the beef for about 5 minutes. Mix the beef stock with the water and pour over meat. Add all other ingredients and allow to simmer on low for about an hour or until carrots are tender.
Goulash and dumplings 002 (476x317) copy
For the dumplings
4 large potatoes, boiled
125ml flour
5ml baking powder
1 egg
2 ml white pepper
Salt
30ml fresh finely chopped parsley
Using a potato ricer, mash all the potatoes.  Mix all other ingredients well and add more flour if mixture needs to be firmer.  Scoop spoonful’s into goulash, place lid back on pot and allow to cook for a further 30 minutes on low or until dumplings are done (knife should come out clean).

Post Navigation

%d bloggers like this: